CALL NOW TO ASK ABOUT OUR DISCOUNTED SUMMER RATES! 215-800-0029 OR 877-570-CITY

ARTICLE ON BED BUG IDENTIFICATION

Bed bugs are parasitic insects that feed on blood. Though they can live and feed on other animals, this particular parasite is fond of human blood and prefer them as their hosts. Other parasites of their kind thrive on animal bloods such as the bat bugs.

The life cycle of a bed bug starts when a particular bed bug has finally positioned itself to its host and lays an egg. Since the host may move around, the common areas where these eggs may be found is within the usual places where the host stays. This could be beds, couches, cars, chairs and other common locations.  The eggs are just one millimeter in length and the hatched nymph is 1.5 mm in size. They will then start to feed and take blood before they can undergo their molting process. Bed bugs molt five times until they reach full adulthood. Every molting stage generally takes about one week. After every molt they generally grow in size until they reach an average of 5.5 mm in length. Female bedbugs must complete all five molting stages in order for them to become fertile. Fertile females can lay three to four eggs every day and can lay as many as 500 eggs in a given time. They continue to lay eggs until the end of their lifespan which is generally none months in warm conditions.

Adult Bed bugs have an oval shaped flat size and are reddish-brown in color. They are very small wingless creatures that have slender legs and antennae. A larvae or nymph form of the bed bugs resemble their adult counter parts but are just smaller and lighter in color.

Due to the fast growth and fast multiplication of the bed bugs, infestation can be considered a big threat.

Desktop Version | Switch To Mobile Version
Back to top
mobile desktop